Posters, part 4

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ln4

A couple of months ago I shared images of posters in our collection.  Photographing all of the posters is one of my goals this year as I know that we have some pretty fantastic ones and it would be great to have updated photographs of all of them.  When the project is completed, the photos will be entered into our database where they will be available to anyone searching our collection online.  I’ve recently been able to work on the project again, so I thought I would share some more posters!

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Posters part 3

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ln66

While we have a lot of beautiful and serious posters, I decided to focus this week on some of the posters that give me a good chuckle, whether they be rhymes from the shipyard to encourage workers or posters warning sailors and soldiers about the dangers of venereal disease.  It sometimes feels a little wrong to laugh at these as I know they were usually meant as serious warnings, but I just can’t help myself!  Anyways, enjoy these gems!

The first poster is one we acquired from Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company in 1962.  There is no information at the bottom of the poster and I have not found another one online, so I don’t know much about it, but I love the imagery of the messy pig.  The second came to us from the shipyard and was used to encourage their employees to work hard to help defeat the Nazis.  The line “And knocked Adolph square on his Axis” cracks me up every time!  The third poster is from 1945 and encourages sailors/soldiers to get an x-ray done.  I guess the idea is that if the big burly guy in the poster is willing to get his done, you should too.  It’s great that he is so happy with himself and sits there and smokes.  If only he knew what we know these days!   Read more

Summer Projects

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USS President Adams, ca 1942
USS President Adams, ca 1942

As summer quickly begins to approach, I’m reminded of a project we had a couple of (awesome) volunteers, Brian and Chris, do last year.  This project involved our two smokestack eagles from the American President Lines.  These eagles never made it onto the smokestack they were intended for as the ship was requisitioned by the Navy prior to its completion, due to WW II.  The ship in question was likely the second President Adams, who began her war service in December 1941.

USS President Adams (AP-38, later APA-19) was built at the Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company in Newport News, Virginia from 1940-1941.  She was originally intended to be a civilian passenger-cargo-ship, but was refitted for military service after being taken by the Navy in June 1941.  On December 25, 1941, shortly after the United States entered WW II, her first encounter with the enemy was with a German submarine where she sustained no damage.  In July of the next year, President Adams was sent to the South Pacific where she took part in the effort to hold Guadalcanal until February 1943.  The rest of 1943 and part of 1944 were spent chasing the Japanese up the Solomon Islands.  After February of 1945, she spent the rest of her time in the Pacific bringing home veterans, which lasted until March 1947.  President Adams was decommissioned in June of 1950 and scrapped in Taiwan in 1974.  For more information about her career, click HERE.   Read more