Propaganda Posters

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I’ve been spending a lot of time recently with our collection of posters, mostly propaganda or advertising, as I’ve been photographing them so we can have the images in our database.  For some reason, I have always been drawn to posters, especially those with bright, colorful images (as with the ones I shared a few posts ago).  So without further ado, here are some of the ones I have been working with this week.

The first poster is a Navy recruiting poster from 1917 and was done by artist Kenyon Cox.  The second is a very bright poster that hung in the Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Company to encourage workers to keep at their work.  The clown is a little creepy, but nevertheless, this is a great poster.  The third is a Russian poster from 1932 that a fantastic volunteer recently translated for me.  I’m not exactly sure why the poster was made, but it might possibly be to celebrate the creation of the Russian Pacific Fleet.   Read more

Garden Club

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We’ve recently begun initiating some programs at the museum to help keep the staff happy and healthy, including starting a Garden Club, of which I became a member.  I joined because I don’t really know that much about gardening, but I really like growing things, especially things that I can eat.  We were given space in one of our courtyards and managed to scrounge up the materials we needed to create the raised beds.  Below are two images from the day we spent creating those beds, for which we had a pretty good and hardworking crowd.  The first shot shows most of the group as we were nearly finished with the first bed, and the second shot shows the three completed beds.  I’m really looking forward to planting and harvesting!

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Object of the Month- Pvt. Joe Louis

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Pvt. Joe Louis Poster from World War II.
Pvt. Joe Louis Poster from World War II.

In honor of Black History Month, we thought it would be appropriate to share an artifact with a strong African American hero.  This poster from World War II shows Joe Louis and his motivation words, a concept that became a household idea for Americans during this time.

“… and we’ll win because we’re on God’s side,” became an important slogan during World War II. Pvt. Joe Lewis, a well known African American boxer, made this phrase a household thing during this time. During the Second World War, this poster was seen throughout the country and Pvt. Louis’ statement inspired other young men to join and support the fight, which made his a very popular advocate for American pride.   Read more