Capture of New Orleans: Farragut’s Rise to Fame

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Map depicting the delta of the Mississippi River and approaches to New Orleans. Printed by Government printing office in 1904 as part of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Navies.

New Orleans was the largest city in the Confederacy with more than 120,000 inhabitants. This cosmopolitan community was a leading shipping, shipbuilding, and industrial center. The city controlled the commerce of the entire Mississippi Valley and its tributaries, like the Ohio, Missouri, and Red rivers. While it was ever so critical for the Confederacy to maintain control of this city, events elsewhere, especially in Tennessee, resulted in New Orleans having inadequate defenses and naval support. The city’s loss would have significant implications.

Confederate Naval Preparations

Much to the dismay of Major General Mansfield Lovell and Flag Officer George Hollins, New Orleans had been stripped of most of its soldiers, cannons, and warships. Many believed that the Federals would try to take New Orleans by way of Union forces coming down the Mississippi. Hollins argued, to a level of insubordination, that every effort possible be made to block the Union fleet access into the Mississippi River from the Gulf of Mexico. He advocated that as the Union ships were lightened to cross the bar into the Southwest passage, the Federals were very vulnerable to attack, and Hollins wished to do so. He created such an uproar that he was reassigned to Richmond, Virginia.   Read more

Way Back Wednesday

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1940 Hole in Great Hall-A

A couple of years ago I posted a similar picture showing this boat and hole from the outside.  You can see that here.  This is an interior shot showing our Portuguese fishing boat being moved into the building.  The boat is very large at over 50 feet long and 13 feet wide and so the only to get it into the building was to bust a hole in the wall.

This shot shoes men on the lake at Deer Park breaking ice, December 20, 1932   Read more

Way Back Wednesdays

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April 1937 Main entrance to museum

A new month means it’s time again for more #WayBackWednesdays photos, showing the exciting history of our museum.  This first picture (directly below) shows the front entrance of the museum (now the business entrance) in April of 1937.  A lot has changed since then as our museum has grown and further developed the area around the building.  I really like the old cars and buses visible in this shot as it makes you wonder if that was the only parking spot for museum visitors.  Probably so!

This next photo (below) shows children operating a bilge pump from USS Hartford that was placed at the museum.  The pump is ca 1865, so it’s great to see that it still worked for these kids.  Hartford was famous as the flagship of Rear Admiral Farragut during the Battle of Mobile Bay in 1964.  She was disposed of in Norfolk, Virginia in 1957, which is likely why we have the pump.  90+ years is an extremely long life for a ship, so she must’v been well built.   Read more