Ida Lewis: Mother of all Keepers

Posted on
2019.0004.000001_01.tif
(Accession Number 2019.0004.000001) -Harper’s Weekly, April 17, 1869. Illustration of Ida Lewis rescuing two drowning soldiers.

Ida Lewis: Mother of All Keepers

Here at The Mariners’ Museum and Park, Ida Lewis is no stranger. We’ve blogged, Tweeted, written, and lectured all about our heroine of Lime Rock Light. However, our mission here at the Museum is all about Maritime Connections because we’re all connected by the water. That’s why I chose Ida Lewis. Her acts of heroism are still inspiring women of all ages and created legacies that now bear her name. Out of these legacies have come a personal maritime connection and a story of another young woman with a link to Ida’s legacy. I want to take Ida’s story one step further than all the reasons she had the reputation of being able to “row a boat faster than any man in Newport.”  As you can probably tell, I’m excited to share these stories with you just in time for Women’s History Month.

Mother’s Keeper

First, I’d be doing you and Ida herself a disservice if I didn’t give you a little background on our brave lightkeeper. Idawalley Zorada (sometimes spelled “Zoradia”) Lewis, the second oldest of four children and eldest daughter of Captain Hosea Lewis. Capt. Lewis became keeper of Lime Rock Light at Newport, Rhode Island, in 1854 when Ida was 12-years-old.   Read more

A Portrait of the Figurehead as a Young Bear

Posted on
The first step is a single light from above.

Once upon a time and a very good time it was there was
a bear coming down along the hallway and this bear
that was coming down along the hall met a nicens little photographer named Brock.

Sorry, James Joyce. You’re probably rolling in your grave at my weak attempts at imitation.   Read more

A Visit from Coast Guard Students

Posted on
_mg_2382-intl-cg-crs
Sailor’s Valentine from Barbados, ca 1875.

On the 28th we had a another visit from the students of the United States Coast Guard’s International Maritime Officer School.  They visit us about twice a year and every time it is a different group of students from different countries.  This time we had students representing 27 different countries and we had artifacts from all but 5, which is not too bad.  Most of the artifacts are prints, but we try to pull out 3D objects wherever possible.  And a big thank you to our photographer Crystal for sharing her photos!

Visit from the Coast Guard

Posted on
TMM; Coast Guard visit to ISCC; 05-26-2015 (1)
Artifacts set out, photo courtesy of Jim Wetherbee

Every year we give a tour to a group from the United States Coast Guard’s International Maritime Officer School; an interesting group who are always so curious and interested in our collection, especially our boats in the International Small Craft Center.  Usually our Chief Curator asks what countries the group is from and then proceeds to point out boats from those countries, but he was not here this year so we did a little something different.

This year we set out a couple tables with artifacts from the countries the group was from, giving them a taste of the scope of our collection.  And don’t let the first image fool you, they swarmed the tables when they first came in, but by the time this was taken they had already dispersed in the Small Craft Center.  Three of the objects made a particular impression on the group.   Read more

Posters, part 7

Posted on
ln243

Our first poster is obviously a WWII poster and encourages people to remember Pearl Harbor and join the Coast Guard to help defend the country.  The image was done by Charles Rosner.  The second poster has pretty much the same message as the first, just without mention of Pearl Harbor.  Both of these posters were used in a recruiting office in Norfolk, VA, which is probably how we ended up with them.  The third poster is one of my favorites, I guess because I don’t generally associate space travel with the Navy.  It is ca 1955 with an unknown artist.

“Pour it on” is a great poster from 1942 by artist Jarret Price.  It was made by the United States War Production Board and it looks as though we might have received our copy from the Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company, which would make sense because we have received many posters from them.  The second is another WWII poster and features a sad, but true, message about the inhabitants of Lidice, Czechoslovakia (now Czech Republic).  The third poster ca 1950’s/60’s encourages women to join the Navy and shows three different positions they can hold.  It was done by artist Lou Nolan.