A Toy’s Surprising Maritime Connection

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Slinky
Image credit: Roger McLassus

A lot of the research that is done to create an exhibit never makes it into the final product that visitors see in the museum.  The research eventually gets whittled down and fine-tuned until final decisions are made on the subject matter, story lines, artifacts, text and labels.  Many times the finished exhibit has very little in common with the original idea. So what happens to all that beautiful research that didn’t end up being used? It is saved in digital and paper files that are used to answer inquiries, create educational events and presentations, and as a starting point for other possible exhibits.  And in the case of our Toys Ahoy: A Maritime Childhood exhibit, the research files provides some great content for a blog post.

Initially some of the exhibit research looked for toys that were, or might have been, used on ships. As it turns out, Slinkys have ended up on military ships, private yachts and possibly even in the children’s nurseries on cruise ships. And the Slinky has another surprising maritime connection.   Read more

One Man's Trash….

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Lego octopus
Lego octopus from Devon, England. Courtesy of the BBC

Well, you know the old saying. But here’s a story from Cornwall (England) to get Lego enthusiasts making vacation plans for the southern UK beaches. Read the full story from the BBC here

Seems that a rogue wave hit the container ship Tokio Express back in 1997 and washed off several containers about 20 miles west of Land’s End. One of the containers was chock-a-block with Legos, about 5 million of them. 17 years later, they’re still washing up.   Read more

Toy Boats You Can’t Play With In The Bathtub

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Double-Turreted Monitor Toy By W.S. Bliss Toy Company
Double-Turreted Monitor, ca. 1883-1900, W.S. Reed Toy Company

Every now and then an absolutely fantastic artifact literally walks through the front door. Usually the owner is looking for more information on it. Occasionally they want an appraisal, although we can’t do that because of our accreditation. And sometimes it turns out to be a donation. In this case, the Museum’s Bronze Door Society made the magic happen.

The Bronze Door Society is a museum membership group whose participants join at a higher level in order to aid us in acquiring artifacts and caring for the ones we already have. They raise funds through special events, and once a year they hold a formal dinner during which they vote on proposals submitted by museum staff members. In the past, these proposals have included conservation projects, scholarships, equipment purchases and artifact acquisitions. In 2011, one of the proposals was the purchase of a particular toy boat.   Read more