Returning Pieces

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Thousand Island Steamboat Company pass, 1896 (1)

Once again I have more good news about pieces that were stolen by our former archivist.  We have a received a number of returns in the past few weeks, including some very rare pieces.  While this process has not been easy, especially when dealing with people who will not return the items or even respond to our letters, we have dealt with some people who restore your faith in humanity.  We have had a few people who returned the items they purchased on eBay, as well as sending us new items as donations to help build up the collection again.  To these people we are eternally grateful.

So, again I will share some of the returned pieces.  Enjoy!   Read more

Born in Ink – the Plans for the SS United States

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These four volumes used to be one book.

Hello again, gentle readers. Welcome back to the Library blog – today, I would like to tell you about a unique volume from the Library’s Rare Book collection that has piqued my interest. I refer to the double-volume schematics and design specifications for the SS United States, a work that is only available at The Mariners’ Museum Library. The first volume of the plan is split into four smaller volumes, because the original work was so incredibly thick that using it was very unwieldy.

All four sub-sections of the first volume deal with the plans, schematics, projected costs, and potential profits of the SS United States. The vessel, often referred to by the number 12201, is compared heavily to the 1930s Cunarder RMS Queen Elizabeth in design, operating costs and potential speed. There is a lot of focus in the plans on the comparative speeds of the ships. In fact, it is often repeated that one of the primary goals in building the SS United States is so that she will claim the record for Fastest Atlantic Crossing several times in a row. How would she do that, you may ask? Well, the plan was to slightly underpower the United States in order to beat the Queen Elizabeth’s speed by a small amount. That way, if the British ever reclaimed the record, the United States could then repeatedly take it back and earn a healthy dose of prestige for her parent company, the United States Lines.   Read more