Posters, part 5

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ln131

This time we have some posters from WWII era.  The first one encourages those on the home front to work on a farm during the summer for the US Crop Corps so that food can continued to be produced for our troops overseas.  The second one is a bit more startling and implies that Nazi’s are  the enemy and a threat to Christianity.  The third is a piece that came from Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company and encourage the worker’s to keep producing so that the military would have what it needed.

The first one in this grouping also comes from Newport News Shipbuilding and encourages people to carpool to work.  I’ve always enjoyed the rhymes that go along with the Shipyard posters.   The second poster is WWI era and has the pastel colors and imagery that I always find so appealing.  It was done by artist James Montgomery Flagg to help recruit men to the Navy.  The last poster is also a recruiting poster, but from WWII.  I know that Lee is generally thought well of, but it seems weird to see his face on a poster for WWII.  Perhaps this piece was aimed at a particular audience.

Mysteries in the Collection

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From time to time, we deal with items that are considered “Found in Collection” pieces.  This doesn’t mean that we never knew these items existed and just came across them suddenly.  (Although this does happen occasionally) Typically these things were dropped off by an anonymous donor or left behind after a curator moved on to retirement or another institution.  So we end up with things without a history of ownership or use. Sometimes, we don’t even know for sure what the heck the item is and have to spend a great deal of time doing research to figure it out. 

 Recently, 32 World War II posters became the latest Found in Collection items to gain our attention.  For the last 59 years they have been stacked in drawers and labeled “unaccessioned” or non-collection pieces.  They originally were donations from the Virginia War Museum that we received in 1954.  Over the years, curators knew they existed, but no one considered them good additions to the collection.  Probably because some were duplicates of posters we already owned.  Or maybe because of the fragile nature of the paper and the large sizes involved.  While some posters were as small as 8 x 10, others are larger than 40 inches tall.  It may seem strange, but the long term and undisturbed storage is one of the best things that could have happened to the posters.    Read more