Posters, part 8

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ln515

Thought it was time to share some more posters, so here we go.  The first one is from the 1960’s and encourages young people to stay in school.  As for the second poster, it was an effort to save the old USS Oregon.  The ship was scrapped in the 50’s, but pieces of it remain in the Tom McCall Waterfront Park in Portland Oregon, including the mast.  The third is a recruiting poster ca 1917 by artist Joseph Christian Leyendecker.

The first poster in this set is also WWI and encourages people to buy victory notes.  The second is WWII by artist Allen Saalburg and works at encouraging patriotism by reminding people of the lives lost in the Pearl Harbor disaster.  The third is also WWII (1944) and stands as a reminder that Americans were also fighting on the Pacific front, not just in Europe where the fighting was coming to a close.  It was done by artist P. Kolada

Posters, part 7

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ln243

Our first poster is obviously a WWII poster and encourages people to remember Pearl Harbor and join the Coast Guard to help defend the country.  The image was done by Charles Rosner.  The second poster has pretty much the same message as the first, just without mention of Pearl Harbor.  Both of these posters were used in a recruiting office in Norfolk, VA, which is probably how we ended up with them.  The third poster is one of my favorites, I guess because I don’t generally associate space travel with the Navy.  It is ca 1955 with an unknown artist.

“Pour it on” is a great poster from 1942 by artist Jarret Price.  It was made by the United States War Production Board and it looks as though we might have received our copy from the Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company, which would make sense because we have received many posters from them.  The second is another WWII poster and features a sad, but true, message about the inhabitants of Lidice, Czechoslovakia (now Czech Republic).  The third poster ca 1950’s/60’s encourages women to join the Navy and shows three different positions they can hold.  It was done by artist Lou Nolan.

A Long Way to Home

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Here, a religious service is held under one of the USS Iowa's gun batteries. From the Photograph Collection.

Hello, readers! My name is Brian Whitenton, and I’m now writing for The Mariners’ Museum Library blog as well The Mariners’ Museum Connections blog! Yaay!

So as we speak, one of the last remaining World War II battleships – the USS Iowa – is being towed to Los Angeles. Once it arrives, it will be a floating museum similar to the USS Wisconsin in Norfolk, Virginia.   Fitting, since the USS Iowa and USS Wisconsin are both the same class of battleship (the Iowa class). This class was designed while WW II was raging, but what about the battleships that were already in existence? What about the ones at Pearl Harbor, for example?   Read more