Where's My Stuff? – Theft at the Museum

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Speaking at the AAM Conference in Baltimore, MD
Speaking at the AAM Conference in Baltimore, MD

Although Cindi and I do most of the posting on this blog, our boss, Jeanne, occasionally has something she wants to share, but she has opted out of having an account here, which is why I am posting on her behalf.  So enjoy this message from Jeanne, aka Boss Lady!

On May 22nd I had the pleasure (alright, I’ll admit it, I was scared to death) of speaking at the American Alliance of Museums annual conference in Baltimore about a subject that is near, but not so dear, to my heart.  The session, titled “Mysterious Disappearances: Where’s my Stuff?” focused on the problem of internal theft in museums and libraries.  The session’s speakers included several noted experts: Miles Harvey, author of the book The Island of Lost Maps; Gregory J. Smith, Executive Vice President at Berkley Asset Protection, an expert in loss control and risk assessment in the fine art and jewelry fields; and Robert Wittman, who served as one of the FBI’s top investigators in cases involving art theft and art fraud who also helped form the FBI’s rapid response Art Crime Team. And me!   Read more

Enjoying the Beautiful Outdoors

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Lion's Bridge
Lion’s Bridge

With the arrival of Spring and sunny, warm weather, I am reminded of all the fun things the museum has to offer outside of the building (especially as my office is rather chilly). It seems as though a lot of people don’t already know this, but the museum owns 550 acres of property, including the Noland Trail and Lake Maury. Part of the vision of our founder, Archer Huntington, was to create an outside space for the public to be able to enjoy along with the museum. Lake Maury was created by constructing a dam (the Lion’s Bridge) near the James River.

Many people in our community are very familiar with Lion’s Bridge as it is a frequently visited area. I mean, what’s not to love? There are a few places to sit down and enjoy beautiful weather while also getting great views of the James River and Lake Maury while the majestic lions stand guard. Every November festive wreaths are placed around the necks of the lions to help bring in the Holidays, which has become a popular event in the community. As for the history of the lions, they were sculpted by the museum’s founder’s wife, Anna Hyatt Huntington (click HERE to learn more about her), ca 1932.   Read more