A Toy’s Surprising Maritime Connection

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Slinky
Image credit: Roger McLassus

A lot of the research that is done to create an exhibit never makes it into the final product that visitors see in the museum.  The research eventually gets whittled down and fine-tuned until final decisions are made on the subject matter, story lines, artifacts, text and labels.  Many times the finished exhibit has very little in common with the original idea. So what happens to all that beautiful research that didn’t end up being used? It is saved in digital and paper files that are used to answer inquiries, create educational events and presentations, and as a starting point for other possible exhibits.  And in the case of our Toys Ahoy: A Maritime Childhood exhibit, the research files provides some great content for a blog post.

Initially some of the exhibit research looked for toys that were, or might have been, used on ships. As it turns out, Slinkys have ended up on military ships, private yachts and possibly even in the children’s nurseries on cruise ships. And the Slinky has another surprising maritime connection.   Read more

Aeronautical Engineer and #mariner

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“It’s a bird!” “It’s a plane.” “It’s superm–” “No, really y’all, it’s a weird plane.”

Frederick K. Kirsten

“Egg-Beater Wing Plane Imitates…Eagle” claimed Modern Mechanics in 1934. Yes, you read that correctly.

As early as 1921, German-American inventor Frederick K. Kirsten (1885-1953)  was working on a wingless, rudderless airplane design. What does that even look like, you ask? Like this:   Read more