Opening Day: What The Mariners’ Museum looked like in the 1930s

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Today, The Mariners’ Museum and Park’s exhibition space is roughly 90,000 square feet; but when the Museum opened to the public in November 1933, there was only a little over 12,000 square feet of gallery space. Sure, this is not a “small” space. All of our houses are probably significantly smaller, but this is a far cry from the originally intended Museum – a grand, sprawling, geometric affair. 

In April 1931, Archer Huntington stated, “My idea for the museum is a structure built not by architects but by engineers, and I think we can do this in the Yard. The moment you attempt to produce an art building on the usual Greek or Roman lines, you have made something which will clash entirely with the exhibits, which are purely scientific and mathematical.” To that end, the Museum’s projected budget for 1931 included $50,000 to “start museum”. The rest of that year’s budget was allocated to the dam, roads, and property maintenance. This vision would not come to pass, though, at least not as originally intended. Instead, the idea of a new building was put on hold (thanks Great Depression), and The Mariners’ Museum exhibits were put in a “temporary” gallery space located in the Museum’s service building.    Read more

Extreme Deep – New Exhibition

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Entrance to the exhibition

Looking for something fun to do with the family (or by yourself) this summer?  We have a new exhibition that explores the mysteries of the deep, Extreme Deep:  Mission to the Abyss.  It opened May 16 and will remain here until September 7.

View interesting creatures of the deep   Read more

Buttersworth Exhibition Closing

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For those who are interested in viewing our Buttersworth Exhibition, B is for Buttersworth, F is for Forgery, you only have a few more weeks to do so!

The last day for the exhibition will be Sunday, April 26, 2015.  It has enjoyed great success with our visitors who are determined to figure out which painting is the forgery!  It’s also allowed people to truly appreciate the wonderful works of art created by James Buttersworth.  So don’t forget to stop by and check them out before the 26th!

The Return of Columbus

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After being on loan for a year, our painting of Christopher Columbus painted ca 1910 by Joaquin Sorolla y Bastida has returned!!

The painting has been traveling with the Sorolla & American exhibition that was organized by the Meadows Museum in Dallas, Texas.  After going to the Meadows Museum, it went to the San Diego Museum of Art and then to Fundación MAPFRE in Madrid.  No matter how hard I tried, I could not convince them to send me with the painting to Madrid.  Shucks!!   Read more

B is for Buttersworth

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Although I am a little late with the announcement, we recently had a new art exhibition open, titled “B is for Buttersworth F is for Forgery“.

The idea is that you can wander around the gallery enjoying the art of James Edward Buttersworth, who was a fantastic maritime artist, while also trying to see if you can spot which is the forgery, for there is only one.   Read more