Siege of Yorktown, Part One: The Navies

Posted on
The Siege of Yorktown, April 1862. Ch. Worret, contributor. Courtesy Library of Congress.
CSS Virginia Enables the 1862 Defense of Yorktown 

In spring 1862, Union general George Brinton McClellan had assembled a very powerful army around Washington, D.C. The Union had already recently achieved several major victories along the Mississippi River and its tributaries, as well as they had captured the North Carolina Sounds. McClellan’s army was poised and ready to strike at the Confederate capital at Richmond, Virginia. General McClellan, often called ‘Young Napoleon’ or ‘Little Mac,’ wanted nothing to do with a march overland toward Richmond. 

This path was blocked by General Joseph E. ‘Joe’ Johnston’s 45,000-strong army defending Manassas. In an effort to flank and isolate Johnston’s army away from Richmond, McClellan conceived the Urbanna Plan to move his army to the Rappahannock River at Urbanna, Virginia, and then strike directly at Richmond. Before the Union general could implement his campaign, Joe Johnston abandoned his Manassas defenses beginning March 6, 1862, and fell back to Fredericksburg. McClellan quickly offered a secondary amphibious operation to strike at Richmond by way of the Virginia Peninsula.   Read more

Time is… corrosion

Posted on
MNMS-2002-01-762 BT2 copy

Hello there readers! It is such a pleasure to be back at work on the USS Monitor. I have missed smelling like a 150 year old ship at the end of a work day and using a crane to move artifacts around… really.

As Kate mentioned last week, we’ve been working on the wooden side of the port carriage for the past month or so. There will be more updates about the gun carriages as we progress with treatment.   Read more

Ask a conservator

Posted on
Looking from forward to aft on the USS Monitor. It will be interesting to see how different the site looks this summer.
Looking from forward to aft on the USS Monitor. It will be interesting to see how different the site looks this summer.

Last week a group of 5th graders from a school in Chesapeake came to visit The Mariners’ Museum and took part in the Clash of Armor program. They wanted to know if we are going back to the wreck site of the USS Monitor. 

This is a great question, and as a matter of fact the underwater archaeologists from NOAA are going to be diving on the Monitor site this summer. They will be mapping the site. They are not planning to recover any more of the vessel. Thanks for the question. I hope you enjoyed your visit to the museum!   Read more

Remembering USS Monitor, Her Designer, and Their Arch Rival

Posted on
IMG_2267 - 2

In October of 1862, USS Monitor was at the Washington Navy Yard for some maintenance and repairs. A commemorative inscription was stamped onto the breech of both of Monitor‘s XI-Inch Dahlgren shell guns at this time to celebrate the Battle of Hampton Roads by recognizing the important men and vessels that participated in the conflict.

The port Dahlgren was inscribed: “WORDEN. MONITOR & MERRIMAC.”   Read more

Help Identify a Mystery Artifact

Posted on
Picture1

Over the past 13 years, NOAA archaeologists and Mariners’ Museum conservators have discovered hundreds of amazing artifacts within USS Monitor‘s revolving gun turret. Some artifacts, like the Dahlgren guns, gun carriages, and gun tools, are undergoing conservation as I type this blog entry. Others have already been fully conserved and are now on display within the USS Monitor Center at The Mariners’ Museum or have been loaned to other institutions around the country to help share Monitor‘s fascinating stories.

However, there are handful of artifacts that continue to mystify us in the lab, particularly those that have been fully conserved but not properly identified. It may sound strange or surprising that in the last 13 years we have not successfully identified every single artifact from the turret. But this is often the case when many materials are excavated from an archaeological setting.   Read more