Beyond the Frame: The Rescuers

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“Unidentified Coast Guard Vessel” Hunter Wood. Oil on Canvas, 1943.1969.0399.000001 | Photo by Brock Switzer/The Mariners’ Museum and Park

The world crashes back into being as you blink hard, the salt water stings your eyes, obscuring your vision.  The menacing water fills your lungs as you gasp for air. Rough waves slosh around you, they roar and toss you about.

Their power would be paralyzing if you stopped to think about it in this terrifying moment, but before you succumb to the water’s might, you see a form moving out of the spray towards you.  There’s someone there, you think you can hear them shouting.    Read more

Beyond the Frame: Where Sea Meets Shore

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“Coast of Cornwall” by William Trost Richards, 1884. Oil on Canvas. 1984.0020.000001. | The Mariners’ Museum and Park

“On the Coast, through the Action of the sea and of frost; the rocks have been worn into the most fantastic shapes and the color is peculiar to the ‘serpentine’ of this district . . . The whole coast has a dark and tragic character….”  – William Trost Richards

Roaring waves pound against the base of a cliff with such power and ferocity that they can be heard far from the cliff’s edge. Golden rays of light kiss the rocks and illuminate the swirling mist  that blows off the sea and obscures the view of the continuing coast. This moment, this scenery, this place has an otherworldly feeling to it. And there’s even more to this than we realize.   Read more

Beyond the Frame: Live Again

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As you walk through a museum, it can sometimes be hard to imagine the artifacts out in the world before they became part of a collection. They weren’t made to be in a museum. But after their original intended life, they live again for us to learn from. In this episode of Beyond the Frame, Kyra Duffley takes us into the International Small Craft Center to explore the life of our Portuguese Moliceiro, as told through a 1933 painting of the boat by Spanish artist José María López Mezquita. In this work, we learn about the people who used this boat to feed their nation. Through this experience, we get the opportunity to become part of its second life.

As you walk through a museum, it can sometimes be hard to imagine the artifacts out in the world before they became part of a collection. They weren’t made to be in a museum. But after their original intended life, they live again for us to learn from. In this episode of Beyond the Frame, Kyra Duffley takes us into the International Small Craft Center to explore the life of our Portuguese Moliceiro, as told through a 1933 painting of the boat by Spanish artist José María López Mezquita. In this work, we learn about the people who used this boat to feed their nation. Through this experience, we get the opportunity to become part of its second life.

Beyond The Frame: The Fun of It

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“Portrait of Anna Vaughn Hyatt” Marion Boyd Allen, 1933. Oil on Canvas. Photo by Brock Switzer/The Mariners’ Museum and Park.

“Every French sculptor has done his Joan of Arc, and is sure to, so that she’d been done in light of every imaginable form as far as I could see. And my challenge was to get a composition that was original, that hadn’t really been done before. That was the fun of it.” – Anna Hyatt Huntington, 1964 Oral Interview for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

Women in Art

As a woman, especially one in the art world, I get a lot of joy from seeing women supporting each other, building one another up and celebrating their achievements. I also love finding women in art history, they’re all too often forgotten and overlooked in favor of their male counterparts, take Artemisia Gentileschi, Judith Leyster, or Élisabeth Vigée Le Brun for example – three of the few female names included in Art History. Judith Leyster and other Dutch female artists were only recently included in the Rijksmuseum Gallery of Honor – their contributions to Dutch art finally recognized after more than 3 centuries.   Read more

Beyond the Frame: Will They or Won’t They?

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“Rescue of the Crew of the USS Monitor by USS Rhode Island, December 31, 1862” William Richardson Tyler, 1892. Oil on Canvas. 2018.0005.000001

The piercing moonlight emanates from the canvas like a siren song, calling you closer, pulling you in as you approach this piece. The wind whips around you, the clouds envelop you, the waves engulf you – there seems to be no escape – it’s too late.

The Power of Light

Personally, I’m a sucker for chiaroscuro – It’s that intense contrast of darkness and light that creates drama in a work of art. It’s what drew me to this piece in the first place. I fell in love with it the moment I saw it. I loved the darkness, the drama, the fact that – for a civil war painting, it wasn’t really “civil war-ish”. Looking at this work, “Rescue of the Crew of the USS Monitor by USS Rhode Island, December 31, 1862” by artist William Richardson Tyler is an experience best enjoyed over a few minutes, at least.    Read more