Let's Take a Dive

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Good morning, readers!

I wanted to share a few interesting photographs with you today to show you some of the pieces we have on the early diving suit because they weren’t always so sleek and appealing. In fact, I wouldn’t be surprised if most of you ran away if someone happened to bring out one of these “antique” suits displayed below on your tropical scuba diving excursions…


 

PSKR381              PSKR382              PSKR386
                      1.                                                                 2.                                                            3.

1. Dunn Diving Head
P0001.001.01.PSKR381
MS163, Box 16
By Robert G. Skerrett; Submarine Photo. Co.

Side view of the underwater helmet.

 

2. Repairing Shoe Using Dunn Diving Head
P0001.001.01.PSKR382
MS163, Box 16
By Robert G. Skerrett; Submarine Photo. Co.

The diving head in action.
Written on verso: Repairing shoe using Dunn Diving Head. Submarine Photo Co. Miami, Fla.

 

3. The Dunn Diving Hood Makes Diving Easy
P0001.001.01.PSKR386
MS163, Box 16
By Robert G. Skerrett; Submarine Photo. Co.

A diver getting into the water.
Written on verso: Going down on short notice to untangle a line in a boats propeller.


P924                           PSKR371
                                           1.                                                                                        2.

1. Up from the Bottom
P0001.001.01.P924
By Daily Press, Inc.

A diver in full diving suit holding onto the steel cable, standing on diving platform.

 

2. Underwater View of Diver on Platform Being Lowered
P0001.001.01.PSKR371
MS163, Box 16
By Robert G. Skerrett; Submarine Photo. Co.

View showing diver on platform being lowered underwater alongside a ship.


PSKR453

 

 

Frontal view of Leavitt all metal deep water diving suit
P0001.001.01.PSKR453
MS0163, Box 16
By Robert G. Skerrett; Submarine Photo. Co.

Written on verso:
A frontal view of the Leavitt all-metal deep water diving suit. The only connection with the surface is a special steel cable by which the diver is lowered and raised. This cable has in its core a telephone circuit which permits the diver to maintain vocal communications with person on the salvage craft. This particular suit is equipped with heavy rubbers gloves which could be used up to 150 feet. At greater depths the suit would be fitted with pincers or tongs operated from within sleeves of the armor.

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